Reviews Archives -

In the time Tool’s taken to sort out all their issues and put Fear Inoculum out, I’ve basically grown up. I was 11 when 10,000 Days came out, and now I’m 24. I think the hype for the album died a few years ago for me when I came to the realization that the band were just going to do what they do best and any unrealistic expectations would only lead to an inevitable disappointment. Let’s be honest: it was never going to live up to the standard the meme set. Fear Inoculum is, in all of its monolithic run-time, a tried and true Tool album. You shouldn’t be surprised.  

Death metal is a hard act to sell and I cannot for the life of me pin down what it is that makes the genre such of a wide spectrum of quality. You’d think tremolo picking, growls, wails, blast beats, and gore-centric lyrics would do it, right? Alongside thrash and black metal, there’s probably the most disposable amount of music being thrown into the genre. Boring riffs, derivative writing, and the robotic drumming of some of these musicians drown what might be diamonds in the rough in a sea of mediocrity. That’s why 20 Buck Spin is probably one of the best labels around today: they do the hard mining and find those diamond to make sure they get their time to shine.  

I’m not terribly well-versed in industrial metal, but I get the basics of it. Bands like Ministry, Fear Factory, and especially the early Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson albums are what I’ve been versed in over the years, so there’s some understanding there. Typically I’m not excited by the genre, and I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t putting this review off. Industrial is just a hit-or-miss thing, and there’s nothing I can really do about that because I love riffs and blast beats. Damned if I do, though, I will admit: 3Teeth are an enigma in this philosophy of mine. You might’ve heard about them, and they’re surely picking up steam in the past few months, and... 

It’s not a matter of if a Baroness album is going to be good, but rather a question of how good it is. TL;DR, Gold & Grey is a rock solid addition to their discography and a fitting conclusion to their cycle of color-coated albums that they’ve been known for. If that tells you what you want to know, fine. Go buy it. Stream it. The hype has been worth it, I can tell you that without a doubt. On a surface level it’s great, but it’s what’s beneath the surface and the machinations of it that make this such a unique and interesting release for a band still experimenting to great effects. Some not so great, as the blemishes do make themselves apparent on this long journey to the finish line. Yet you can’t... 

As I approached the box office for Dance Gavin Dance’s show in New York, I heard from the customer next to me that the show had completely sold out. Look back a few years ago and Dance Gavin Dance were just introducing clean vocalist Tilian Pearson into the band, and now they’re selling out one of the larger venues in NYC. Ain’t that something. Back when the mallcore/Warped Tour band phase was sweeping America circa 2010/11-ish, Dance Gavin Dance were thrown around in that scene quite frequently. There was always something off about the experimental post-hardcore act, but Dance Gavin Dance stood out, if for any reason being their non-compliance with the trend that was going on. They fit in, yeah, but kinda like... 

I believe the ultimate testament to a great live act is the reward you get for seeing the band multiple times. Now, granted, you can go on about production and stage presence and different setlists, but the true factor of success is the euphoria one gets afterwards. With that noted, I really don’t know how Baroness does it. With a – pun intended –  colorful spectrum of sound (Pretty sure that’s been done before) at their disposal and the energy flared at max capacity through a full set, one would be certain that Baroness are a band poised for longevity in today’s music scene. This isn’t just a great metal and rock band anymore: they’re making timeless music and putting on epic shows like it’s... 

It’s been nearly ten years since Periphery’s debut album, and in that time the group has become a formidable force of production innovation, songwriting, and musical chops recognizable across the entirety of the metal spectrum. What started as a bedroom project is now a full-fledged touring outfit and a former solo project has become a self-oscillating music machine that constantly challenges itself. Periphery IV: Hail Stan, unbelievably the band’s sixth album, is the first in which the band has struck independent on their new label, 3Dot Recordings, and with it comes the freedom of complete musical expression. While the band continue to expand their sound outward and innovate on what they’ve founded, they’ve... 

“Higher. Further. Faster.” is the slogan that follows all of the marketing for Captain Marvel, but what it doesn’t tell you is that it’s going to squander all the potential it has going for it in a lowly, fractionally, and slowly moving manner, dragging you through a meandering second act that takes away the appeal of the character’s strengths. Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) is billed as one of – nay, the – the strongest Marvel characters put on screen, and while it’s clear that her power level rivals that of Thor and possibly the insidious Thanos, what she isn’t strong enough to overcome is clunky and uneven writing and bland acting that ultimately show blemishes on a franchise that has routinely... 

Oh boy, here we go.  

Flash back to Rockstar’s Mayhem Festival about ten years ago. Every year I would attend this all-day event and the tour would cycle in newer bands to open the show up. Sometimes you’d get lucky and some memorable acts would come out of this touring circuit, and yet some years you’d get a band that was only getting their time to shine for five minutes. If you were lucky they’d return another year or go on to do another tour with one of the headliners again during the fall, but that was a rare case. Such is the worry I had with Astronoid, as I’d feared that their first album would be the peak for the band. What with their dreamscape-style atmospheres and adrenaline-charged riffing, it was hopefully not going... 

It’s been a while since Ensiferum have graced North America with their presence. Three and a half years, to be exact. For any band that’s an eternity, but Ensiferum’s fans are patient and the waiting has finally paid off. The band have finally made their return in a time when most European bands find themselves forced to cancel tours and settle for their loss, and the fans came out in droves to see the band be welcomed back knowing that they have actually touched down in America. Their return to New York was nothing less than a triumphant return.  

With how 2018 was for rock music, it’s no wonder so many are spelling doomsday for the scene. There’s no mainstream attention or innovation for rock currently, and your atypical rock bands are just aping on what’s expected from the genre. Except Clutch. Let’s be real, love them or hate them, Clutch are doing the exact opposite of literally everyone else and doing well for themselves, too. The near-sold out show at Starland Ballroom can attest to that. I’ve  only been to one post-Christmas show, so I was honestly nervous that the turn out would have been a small one. Quite the opposite, as I’ve stated, as Clutch have a serious draw in New Jersey. Nor have I seen Clutch before, so... 

RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
YouTube
Instagram
SOCIALICON

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Search

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

ADS

shadocon_banner